Science

Connect with Lyme

Science

10/14/2021

Head Trauma and Lyme Disease

When Brian finished college, he had dreams of becoming a professional hockey player. Unfortunately, he got a rough blow to the head and sustained a concussion. Although he didn’t lose consciousness, he developed a host of symptoms that led to leaving the ice. Eventually finding out he had Lyme disease, Dr. Dan Kinderleher and other professionals in the space wondered how post-concussive syndrome can bring out symptoms of the disease and how to ensure patients can be better treated in the future.

Science

09/23/2021

Lyme Disease and Neurofeedback

Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge is an author, therapist, psychologist, board-certified neurofeedback provider, and media personality who has been in/on hundreds of television shows, podcasts, and major publications. Through her Ridgefield, CT center, she works with people all over the world providing neurofeedback in person and in-home neurofeedback virtually. She is highly regarded in the field and due to her level of expertise in Lyme and PANS/PANDAS.

Science

09/14/2021

Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing for Determining Disability in Lyme Disease

Determining eligibility for disability insurance claims can be an extremely hard task, especially when insurance companies are incentivized not to pay. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), specifically 2-day CPET, is a possible answer for patients to scientifically showcase how fatigue impacts their ability to work. If you need help solidifying your claims, this blog may contain the answers you are seeking.

Science

06/14/2021

Lyme Disease, Kids and Mental Illness: Are Tick-borne Infections Contributing to the Epidemic in Mental Illness?

Have you heard of a condition called autoimmune encephalitis or “brain on fire”? It’s a swelling of the brain that can present with severe physical and mental symptoms, and it can be caused by tick-borne pathogens, including bartonella and mycoplasma. Dr. Dan Kinderlehrer recently conducted a study of 10 randomly selected adolescent patients with psychiatric symptoms so severe that they couldn’t function at school or at home to see if there was a correlation with tick-borne diseases.